GLOBAL NETWORK OF BANGLADESHI BIOTECHNOLOGISTS

NEWS

Stem cell:Immune response spurs cell switch

Stem cell:Immune response spurs cell switch

In an article entitled, “Immune response  spurs cell switch published on the 8th of November (491:163) issue of Nature based on an article published in October 26 issue of Cell (151, 547–558),  John P. Cooke at Stanford University in California and associates report that controlling cellular immune responses could help researchers to turn adult cells into embryonic-like stem cells without having to insert any genetic material. The authors consider that the most efficient way to reprogram adult cells is to genetically alter them, but this approach may cause problems in cell therapy. Dr Cooke works for the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium (PCBC). Their objective was to identify and characterize progenitor cell lineages in order to direct the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells to desired cell fates, and to develop new strategies to address the unique challenges presented by the transplantation of these cells.

The most efficient way to reprogram adult cells, according to the above authors is to genetically alter them, but this can cause problems in cell therapy. John Cooke at Stanford University in California and his colleagues found that the viruses that are normally used to deliver reprogramming genes into cells alter the cells in another, unanticipated way. The inflammatory response to the virus induces changes that open up the structure of chromatin — the tightly packaged DNA and protein that makes up chromosomes.

Using virus-free reprogramming techniques and a synthetic molecule to activate an inflammatory pathway in adult cells, the researchers obtained 25 reprogrammed cell colonies per experiment. No such colonies were generated if the immune pathway was inhibited. Controlling inflammatory pathways could make it easier not only to produce genetically unaltered, reprogrammed stem cells, but also to direct cell fate in other ways.

The goal of the PCBC,  a part of the NHLBI (The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)  is to identify and characterize progenitor cell lineages, to direct the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells to desired cell fates, and to develop new strategies to address the unique challenges presented by the transplantation of these cells.

Recent News

Calendar

February 2017
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 1 2 3